Fri, January 23 2015

Link Round Up

Liz Ragland's avatar

Marketing Content Associate, Network for Good

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Filed under:   Fun stuff •

We love reading amazing content from across the sector. Here are a few nonprofit marketing and fundraising resources that stood out this week:

Link Round Up
  • We're big fans of the crew over at GrantStation and their 5 quick tips for launching your grantseeking in 2015. (via Guidestar)

  • If you are a Google Analytics user, you must try this add-on for Google Sheets. If you're not a Google Analytics super user, send this link over to someone who is and I promise you will make their day.

  • DoSomething.org accidentally sent a message meant for a very specific segment of their list to their entire database (2.1 million phone numbers). If you’ve ever made a mail merge error or mass email mistake, you feel their pain (and embarrassment). They followed up with a great idea: an apology in the form of a playlist, featuring songs that used humor to poke fun at their mistake. This fun apology might not work with one of your major donors but for DoSomething’s audience, teenagers, it was a hit. (Via Chronicle of Philanthropy)

  • We all know stories are key to grabbing supporters’ attention and inspiring them to act. Jeff Brooks, one of our all-time favorite fundraisers, shares his presentation on how to tell stories that motivate donors to give. (via Future Fundraising Now)

  • Is it time to ditch the dating metaphor when it comes to donor relationships? (via Achieve)

  • Nonprofits in space? Consider a “moon landing” event for your organization to rally public interest in your cause. (via MarketingSherpa)

Have a must-read story or resource you’d recommend? Share it in the comments section below!

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Wed, January 21 2015

Quick Takeaways from the Pew Social Media Report

Caryn Stein's avatar

VP, Communications and Content, Network for Good

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Filed under:   Social Media •

The folks at the Pew Research Center recently published updates to their Social Media Report. Here are a few highlights:

Facebook still reigns supreme. It comes as no surprise that 71% of all online adults are on Facebook, which also sees 70% of users engaging with the site at least daily. 

More older adults adopting social networks. But they’re mostly on Facebook. 56% of all online adults 65 and older now use Facebook, which equals 31% of all seniors. That said, all networks featured in the report saw significant jumps in the number of 65+ users.

Visual platforms continue to emerge as key networks, especially with younger users. Over half of young adults (ages 18-29) online use Instagram. Nearly half of all Instagram users use the site daily.

Pew Social Media Report Site Usage

You can download the full report from the Pew website.

So what does this mean for your nonprofit marketing plans?

Know your audience.
Take the time to define the audience you’re trying to reach and understand where they’re spending their time. If your goal is to activate Boomers, assess your Facebook outreach and create content that appeals to their sense of identity and need for transparency. If you’re looking to mobilize younger supporters, consider documenting your work and the impact of donors via Instagram photos.

Resist the urge to be everywhere.
The Pew researchers found that 52% of online adults use multiple social media sites, which is an increase from 2013. For most nonprofits, though, it’s probably not advisable or realistic to spread resources too thin across multiple outlets. Your best bet, especially if you’re still establishing your social media strategy, is to focus on regular quality engagement on one platform. Measure your results and keep an eye on relevant activity on other networks before expanding. Remember:  your social efforts need to reinforce your marketing efforts in other channels.

Be realistic about your goals for social.
We know that donors are engaging with nonprofits and each other on social, but most online dollars are coming in through non-social. Focus on using social as a listening and engagement platform, rather than expecting Twitter or Facebook to become your organization’s magic money machine. Think of social as a tool for understanding what interests your supporters and use your outreach to develop relationships with them.

Carefully measure your ROI.
Although Facebook is the most widely used social media site with the most engaged users, keep in mind that it is becoming increasingly more difficult to break through the noise (and the Facebook algorithm) and fully reach your audience through the platform. On the Care2 blog, Allyson Kapin recently outlined why it’s getting harder to see a return from Facebook advertising.

Even if you’re not paying for social media advertising, weigh the time and attention your staff spends on social media with the results you see and progress to your goals. To get the most out social, you do need to commit to posting quality content and spending time building your presence and the relationships that result.

Is social media on your 2015 list of priorities? Share your thoughts below and let us know how you’re incorporating Facebook, Twitter, and others into your nonprofit marketing strategy.

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Tue, January 20 2015

Next Frontier of Storytelling in the Nonprofit Sector

Liz Ragland's avatar

Marketing Content Associate, Network for Good

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Filed under:   Fundraising essentials • Writing •

Vanessa Chase HeadshotEditor’s note: This post was written by Vanessa Chase, founder of The Storytelling Non-Profit. You can check out more thoughts on storytelling on her blog. Or, if you’re in the mood to watch a webinar on storytelling, you can download the archived version of her Nonprofit911 webinar.

Storytelling is quickly becoming part of the everyday fabric of nonprofit fundraising and communications. While some might suggest that storytelling is simply the latest and greatest trend, much evidence suggests that it’s a fundamental type of human communication working its way into organizational communications. We are entering a new era where organizational communication will no longer be sterile, dry, and boring. Instead, it will sound human. This is the new standard that storytelling and narrative communications are bringing to our sector.

As we hit the ground running in 2015, I anticipate seeing a greater volume of storytelling from nonprofits. This probably comes as no surprise to you. More organizations of varying sizes and causes will hop on the storytelling bus. They will find unique ways to talk about their impact, great staff, and amazing donors. We will hear these stories through the written word, photos, videos, and more. A great many stories will be told online because of the range of formats available to tell them. Many online story platforms are considered to be more interesting and engaging than print.

What else can we expect to see in 2015? Here are two emerging trends that will likely come to the forefront this year.

Storytelling in Stewardship

Donor retention has been a hot topic over the past few years. It is a well-known fact that for many years, organizations were losing more donors than they were retaining. Last year, however, reports showed that the sector retention rates are on the rise. This can largely be attributed to organizations putting a greater emphasis on donor stewardship. Thank you notes, phone calls, and other little touches all add up. What’s more, stories are the perfect type of content to use in stewardship materials. They naturally illustrate impact and outcomes while connecting people through shared emotional experiences.

This year, I think we’ll see more nonprofits overturning conventional approaches to donor stewardship and utilizing stories as a key part of stewardship content. Union Gospel Mission uses stories in its newsletters to show donors how they make the organization’s mission possible. Rather than sharing a ton of dry statistics, the YMCA of Greater Vancouver uses stories in its annual report to talk about impact.

Storytelling in stewardship tip: Take a look at your current thank you letter. Look for the instances where you talk about impact and see if you can find a relevant story to include that will help donors visualize their gift in action.

Community Storytelling

One thing I value most about storytelling is that it communicates emotions and experiences in a way that helps people empathize with each other. This is how connections are made and communities are formed. Nonprofits are uniquely positioned at the center of many constituent groups and have the opportunity to facilitate storytelling between members of their community. Online or offline, donor or nondonor, it doesn’t matter where or who. What matters is that in these various places, we invite people to share their own stories. The benefit of this practice is creating stronger communities to which people truly feel they have a tie.

There are many examples of how organizations crowdsource community stories, which are then shared on websites and social media. The University of Arkansas’ annual giving program has a special landing page where donors can share their stories. The university then uses donor stories on its giving website. Here’s one example:

U of A Stories

Community storytelling tip: Reach out to your active social media followers and ask if they have a story they would like to tell. Encourage them to share a story about their passion for the cause or a personal connection they have to your mission. If you want to get the best stories, a phone conversation or in-person meeting is best.

These are just two storytelling trends we’ll see in 2015. With so many rapid changes in digital media, we’re bound to see even more exciting storytelling techniques emerge.

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Thu, January 15 2015

2014 Year-End Giving Results in Big Win Online for Nonprofits

Caryn Stein's avatar

VP, Communications and Content, Network for Good

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Filed under:   Fundraising essentials •

It’s no secret that year-end giving is an important source of donation dollars for most nonprofits. Last year was no exception and we saw a lot of “generous procrastinators” giving big online in December 2014. When we looked at organizations who received donations on the Network for Good platform in both December 2013 and December 2014, we saw an 18% increase in total donation volume year over year.  A few other important notes about year-end giving results:

  • The total number of donations also grew year over year. In December 2014, 22% more donations were made to charities through Network for Good compared to December 2013.

  • As expected, #GivingTuesday was a big driver of December donations on the Network for Good platform in 2014, with over $4.5M raised on December 2. This represented a 148% increase over total donation volume on #GivingTuesday 2013.

  • December giving also accounted for 30% of all online donations made to nonprofits through Network for Good in 2014, with 10% of all annual giving happening on the last three days of the year. This stat has remained consistent for the last 5 years, underscoring the significance of year-end giving on overall fundraising results.

  • The average gift size for the month of December also increased by 6.5% compared to 2013.


Want more insight on how online giving is growing? Stay tuned! In February, we’ll release our Digital Giving Index, which will take a closer look at online giving trends. We’ll share where, how, and how much donors gave across our digital channels in 2014.

How did your year-end fundraising campaigns perform? Chime in with your experiences in the comments and let us know what you plan to build on—or change—in 2015!

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Wed, January 14 2015

A Familiar Face on the Forbes 30 Under 30 List

Liz Ragland's avatar

Marketing Content Associate, Network for Good

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Filed under:   Fun stuff •

In the 2014 Forbes 30 Under 30 list there was a familiar face on the list: Julie Carney from Gardens for Health International.
Julie

Julie, and two other young women, co-founded Gardens for Health International in 2010 to promote agriculture as part of the solution to large-scale public health challenges. Since then, they’ve helped over 2,000 Rwandan families and partnered with 18 health centers to combat chronic childhood malnutrition.

We’re a big fan of Julie and Gardens for Health because of the important, life-changing work they do. We’ve had the opportunity to get to know this organization and their mission because they are one of our DonateNow customers. We’re such big fans, we even wrote a case study about their success as stellar fundraisers.

Congratulations Julie! And to the Gardens for Health team: keep up the good work! We can’t want to see what you accomplish this year.

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